Twitter and Facebook in the classroom

4 Aug

There was a wonderful book published several years ago called Twitterature which attempted to convey the essence of some of the most famous texts of all time into a series of 20 tweets or less.  While I do not believe that reading these tweets is, in any way, an appropriate substitute for reading the texts themselves, I think the basic premise of Twitterature has application in a classroom setting.

Tweets could be used to summarise key aspects in a text.  Students could then combine these tweets into a text summary at the conclusion of the unit, perhaps even using the tweets as headings in their notes.  A tool like this could help render the experience more authentic.  A variation on this would be to have key political figures tweeting milestones in historical battles, or journalists tweeting about key political and social events as if they were present and reporting at the time.

Facebook variants, such as this tool, can also be used in the classroom.  Facebook-style news feeds can be used to map plot, as was achieved here in relation to Hamlet.  There is also opportunity to create character profiles (for literary characters as well as historical personalities) thus testing student knowledge.

One Response to “Twitter and Facebook in the classroom”

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Tweeting for Freedom | Once uPUN a time... - August 25, 2013

    […] were created on Classtools.net.  I have blogged about the possible uses of this application on a previous occasion.  I really like that the template encourages historical accuracy.  Such accuracy allows students […]

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