Archive | July, 2016

Engaging with opinions

30 Jul

I am on a mission to prepare my Year 10 students for Year 11.  For those of my students who are intent on studying Advanced English next year, this means that I need to help them develop their ability to engage critically with the texts they study and the perspectives that exist about the style and content of authors whose work we study.

To ease them into this process I have compiled a number of comments made in interviews and articles about the ideas explored in and modes of representation in the work of our focus poet.  As I introduce students to this poet and her work, students are encouraged to make connections between the commentaries provided and the information that is being provided as part of the introductory Powerpoint.  In particular, students have been asked to find quotes which support the information being provided to them, and to articulate WHY they think it is relevant.  So far, students have participated positively in this process, demonstrating an ability to articulate their viewpoints and make connections between their own views and those flagged in the commentaries and/or by their peers.

As the unit progresses, I plan to keep returning to these quotes, asking students to make connections between the quotes and the texts we are studying.  I also hope to be able to extend students by asking them to extend and/or critique the provided commentaries.

Advertisements

Language that resonates

28 Jul

A while ago I wrote a post entitled ‘The Power of ONE‘.  In that post, I discussed a strategy in which students had to read a section of text and isolate ONE sentence, ONE phrase and ONE word that resonated with them and was relevant to the text’s overall message.  They then had to justify their choices.

I recently used this activity with a junior class in relation to an excerpt from a Shakespearean text which we are studying.  The results were really interesting in that they reflected students’ own interests and priorities.

The more vocal feminists in my class isolated sentences, phrases and words that pertained to the treatment of women in the text and, more particularly, what they perceived as normalised or institutionalised portrayal of women as limited or inferior.

My students who are experiencing their first crushes and are beginning to embark on their first relationships were far more attuned to the sentences, phrases and words that offered advice about love and relationships.  In many instances, the sentences, phrases and words resonated because of the perceived usefulness or uselessness of the advice offered.

Other students were variously incensed or entertained by the disconnect between appearance and reality, and focused on these ideas.  These students often chose sentences, phrases and words which were susceptible to multiple interpretations.

This activity was great as it allowed me to get to know my students better.  It also offered students an opportunity to articulate and reflect upon their thought processes and, in many instances, model this thinking for students who were struggling to engage with the text.

Post-it note conceptual mapping

26 Jul

I teach a number of mid to lower ability classes in which students struggle to understand nuances of the concepts and ideas that we explore as part of the English course.

To help students think critically and creatively about a topic, I want to implement a new approach to creating concept maps.  I plan to provide students with a concept and a set of post-it notes.  Working individually, students are going to write down words and phrases associated with that concept.  Then, students will work in small groups, pool their post-it notes and discuss the words and phrases they consider relevant.  They might also add additional words and phrases to the mix if required.  A class discussion will follow.  Students will then work in their groups to organise their post it notes so that the most important words/phrases or in the middle and the least important are on the margins.  In their groups they will have to discuss, agree and justify their criteria for importance.   The concept maps and reasoning behind them will then be shared with the class.

I am hoping that the ‘thinking pauses’ and discussions built in to this activity will help students to develop their reasoning skills and ability to engage critically with concepts studied.

‘Hear, Think, Wonder’

24 Jul

I recently attended a professional development session about ‘Visible Thinking’.  This is not the first such session I have been to, but it was definitely the most engaging.

I this session we explored the well-known thinking routine ‘See, Think, Wonder’.  In this routine, students are guided through a process which helps them to articulate what it is they see in a text, and then make connections between what they see, the creation of meaning, and any broader questions that might arise.

As evident by posts on this blog, I often explore Spoken Word poetry in my classes.  With this in mind, I want to adapt the ‘See, Think, Wonder’ routine, focusing first on what students ‘hear’.  I hope that by doing this students will be better able to note and recognise the impact of sibilance, plosive consonants, alliteration, assonance, consonance, pace, pauses, emphasis, shifts in tone, and changes in volume.

Civil Rights

13 Jul

I recently watched an episode of Foreign Correspondent about the Black Lives Matter movement.  It was really interesting to learn about the movement and to see it framed as an extension of the Civil Rights movement.

I think it would be interesting to study this episode alongside other texts spanning from the Civil Rights movement to today.  In particular, it would be interesting for students to make comparisons with Martin’s Big Words (a picture book), ‘Diallo’ (spoken word poem), ‘Even if it gets to 104 degrees’ (poem), and ‘I Have a Dream’ (speech).  Students could also source newspaper articles and documentaries of their own.

AOS Journeys

8 Jul

A number of schools are looking to revitalise their Year 10 and Year 11 courses by introducing Areas of Studies that better prepare their students for AOS Discovery in Year 12.  A popular choice seems to be AOS Journeys.  With this in mind, I have compiled a list of texts which could be used as related material for a unit with ‘Journeys’ as the conceptual focus.  The list is not arranged in any particular order, and I will continue adding to it over time.

  1. Jasper Jones by Craig Silvey (novel)
  2. The Ultimate Safari by Nadine Gordimer (short story)
  3. Looking for Alibrandi by Melina Marchetta (novel)
  4. Over a Thousand Hills I Walk With You by Hanna Jansen (biography)
  5. ‘I am an African’ by Thabo Mbeki (speech)
  6. Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury (novel)
  7. ‘I Have a Dream’ by Martin Luther King Jnr (speech)
  8. ‘The Manhunt’ by Simon Armitage (poem)
  9. ‘Refugee Blues’ by W.H. Auden (poem)
  10. I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings by Maya Angelou (autobiography)
  11. ‘Caged Bird’ by Maya Angelou (poem)
  12. Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close by Jonathan Safran Foer (novel) (or the film adaptation)
  13. September, directed by Peter Carstairs (film)
  14. Selected The Gods of Wheat Street episodes (television drama)
  15. The Secret Life of Walter Mittydirected by Ben Stiller (film)
  16. Cartography for Beginners‘ by Emily Hasler (poem)
  17. ‘Journey to the Interior’ by Margaret Atwood (poem)
  18. The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry by Rachel Joyce (novel)
  19. ‘And of Clay We Are Created’ by Isabel Allende (short story)
  20. Cool Runnings, directed by Jon Turteltaub (film)
  21. For Colored Girls, directed by Tyler Perry (film)
  22. The Second Bakery Attack‘ by Haruki Murakami (short story)
  23. Americannah by Chimmamanda Ngozi Adichie (novel)
  24. All That I Am by Anna Funder (novel)
  25. The Help by Kathryn Stockett (novel) (or the film aedaptation)
  26. Grave of the Fireflies, directed by Isao Takahata (film)
  27. A Mighty Heart, directed by Michael Winterbottom (film)
  28. Girl Rising, directed by Richard E. Robbins (film)
  29. The Tempest by William Shakespeare (play)
  30. Hamlet by William Shakespeare (play)
  31. Tell the Wolves I’m Home by Carol Rifka Brunt (novel)
  32. Anzac Girls (television series)
  33. Time’s Arrow by Martin Amis (novel)
  34. Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro (novel)
  35. The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver (novel)
  36. The Color Purple by Alice Walker (novel)
  37. Meet the Patels, directed by Ravi and Geeta Patel (film)
  38. Inside Out, directed by Pete Docter and Ronnie del Carmen (film)
  39. The Testimony, directed by Vanessa Block (documentary)
  40. The Lie‘ by T. Coraghessan Boyle (short story)
  41. Lion, directed by Garth Davis (film)
  42. A Sheltered Woman‘ by Yiyun Li (short story)
  43. Elizabeth is Missing by Emma Healey (novel)
  44. The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind by William Kamkwamba (memoir)
  45. A Long Way Gone by Ishmael Beah (memoir)
  46. ‘Home’ by Warsan Shire (poem)
  47. Persepolis by Marjane Satrapi (film or graphic novel)
  48. Life of Pi by Yann Martel (novel)
  49. Freedom Writers, directed by Richard LaGravenese (film)
  50. The African Doctor, directed by Julien Rambaldi (film)