Archive | October, 2017

‘The Interlopers’

31 Oct

I recently read ‘The Interlopers‘, a short story in which two feuding men find themselves trapped beneath a tree on the land the subject of their dispute.

I think this could be an interesting related text for AOS Discovery and would pair particularly well with The Tempest.  Like Prospero, the protagonists are blinded by hatred and anger.  These emotions prevent them from making any meaningful discoveries about themselves and their world.  It is only when circumstances transpire to open their minds that they are able to discover.

Advertisements

So… I had to teach a music class

29 Oct

As regular followers of this blog know, I am an English teacher.  Last week I had to take a one-off junior music class.

This class did not have sufficient work left to keep them occupied for the lesson.  I do not have any music knowledge.  So, in a blind panic, I created a new game: musical charades.  This game worked exactly like normal charades, except that students were confined to the categories of band, song title and instrument.  To my complete surprise the lesson worked beautifully – students were engaged and motivated!

The success of this activity got me thinking about whether I could adapt the game for use in a junior English class.  Perhaps the focus could be on book or film titles.

Subverting Fairy Tales

28 Oct

I have recently read Kissing the Witch (Emma Donoghue), a collection of interlinked short stories which subvert well known fairy tales.

I wish I had read this a little earlier as one of these stories would have been a good addition to a recent lesson sequence about subverting fairy tales.  Inspired by the three tales told by the monster in The Monster Calls, I decided to examine texts that incorporate some fairy tale elements but subvert or challenge others.

To illustrate the point, we engaged with a picture book retelling of The Three Little Pigs and a FANTASTIC short story entitled ‘There Was Once’ by Margaret Atwood.  After this discussing these and making connections to A Monster Calls, I asked students to select a fairy tale and subvert it.

Together we brainstormed some amazing ideas, framing our potential points of challenge or subversion as a series of interlinked questions.

  • What if the bears trespassed in the home owned by Goldilocks?  What if she was home?  What if she had a gun?  New bear skin rug?
  • What if Belle has taken the Beast from the wild?  What if the animal rights advocates found out?
  • What if Pinocchio was a real boy?  And a minority?  And he lied to the police?
  • What if Snow White’s experience of a poisoned apple prompted her to pursue an organic farming venture?
  • What if the witch in Hansel and Gretel was involved in human trafficking?
  • What if Cinderella was told from the perspective of one of the stepsisters?
  • What if Aladdin needed a visa to travel to a whole new world?
  • What if the Emperor was arrested after engaging in public nudity?
  • What if the Princess in The Princess and the Pea did not discover a pea beneath her many mattresses?  What if she discovered a handgun, or drugs?  What if she was undercover detective?

Exciting new pairings!

23 Oct

My list of suggested textual pairings now includes over 140 options!

I have tried to incorporate texts that schools may have already, pairing them with new options to renew student and teacher interest.

I have also incorporated some texts that may not be classroom staples but, in my view, should be!

If you have any additional suggestions, or have tried some of these options in your classroom, please let me know!

Debating in the Classroom

22 Oct

I have been working to engage my students in meaningful learning activities when their interest in traditional reading, writing and discussion is waning.

I recently tried to engage my Year 8 students in a modified debate around issues relevant to their genre study.  It worked!

I provided students with the topic and then divided them into two teams, affirmative and negative.  Students used a scaffold to organise their information, working first individually and then coming together as a team.  They then decided on the speaking order.

The two teams faced off against one another, with each student required to rebut one point previously made and to advance one of their own.  As the debate progressed, I wrote these points on the board, crossing off the points that had been successfully demolished by the opposing team.  This helped students to focus their argument.

Although my students were not keen initially, I found that their competitive sides soon kicked in.  It was fantastic to watch stronger students supporting weaker ones and to see everyone, even reluctant public speakers, giving it a red hot go!