Archive | April, 2018

Engaging the disengaged

9 Apr

I am hoping to be able to spend some time this year developing more engaging and innovative learning activities for some of my more disengaged students.  Here are some of my ideas thus far:

  • Create the pitch for a musical adaptation of the Shakespearean text we have been studying.  Which elements of the text would you retain, which would you change?  Who would you cast and why?  Write the song for a key scene in the play.  Create a storyboard outlining the plot.  Produce a costume for one of the main characters.
  • Write the next chapter of the novel we have been studying.
  • Re-write a section of the text from the perspective of a secondary character.
  • Re-imagine the poem we have studied as a narrative/conversation/feature article/persuasive speech.
  • Transform the poem we have been studying into a spoken word poem.  Justify your performance choices.

If you have any other good ideas I’d love to hear them!

Drawing out connections between texts

8 Apr

I have just commenced a comparative study with one of my classes.  Many students in this class are a bit disengaged, preferring to have the answers given to them rather than thinking for themselves.  To address this issue, I decided to take it upon myself to build their confidence in, and capacity to, interpret texts independently.

To do this, I gave them two columns of information.  The first column included extracts from a Shakespearean text, and the second quotes from the collection of poems that was to form the comparison.  Without further information, and without the aid of Google, students had to work in pairs to read the quotes and make educated guesses about the potential points of thematic connection.

During class discussion, students them had to support their responses with evidence from the quotes.  We did this using a thinking routine called ‘what makes you say that?’  As suggested by the name, kids who gave responses unsupported by evidence where asked ‘what makes you say that?’ as a means of prompting critical and analytical engagement.

It was a really successful activity, with students teasing out all the key ideas I had planned to canvass in the unit and more.

Mapping Australian Poetry

7 Apr

I am in the process of putting together a unit of work that explores changes in the Australian voice over time.  This unit will require students to explore key examples of Australian poetry and to understand how these poems are shaped by social, political and cultural contexts.

I think it will be helpful for my students to have an understanding of Australian history (in broad and general terms).  As such, I want to show them this interactive timeline.  Hopefully students can use this as a reference point, along with specific information about the poets whose work we study, to develop their capacity to discuss the contextual frameworks that inspire and inform texts.