Drawing out connections between texts

8 Apr

I have just commenced a comparative study with one of my classes.  Many students in this class are a bit disengaged, preferring to have the answers given to them rather than thinking for themselves.  To address this issue, I decided to take it upon myself to build their confidence in, and capacity to, interpret texts independently.

To do this, I gave them two columns of information.  The first column included extracts from a Shakespearean text, and the second quotes from the collection of poems that was to form the comparison.  Without further information, and without the aid of Google, students had to work in pairs to read the quotes and make educated guesses about the potential points of thematic connection.

During class discussion, students them had to support their responses with evidence from the quotes.  We did this using a thinking routine called ‘what makes you say that?’  As suggested by the name, kids who gave responses unsupported by evidence where asked ‘what makes you say that?’ as a means of prompting critical and analytical engagement.

It was a really successful activity, with students teasing out all the key ideas I had planned to canvass in the unit and more.

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