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‘The Disappearing’

14 Jul

The Disappearing is an interactive website which offers a means of poetically representing places and experiences which are disappearing.  These places and experiences are sometimes disappearing due to the passage of time,  other times due to environmental factors, and sometimes due to urbanisation.

I think this would be an interesting related text to use alongside Go Back to Where You Came From for HSC AOS Discovery.   Go Back explores individuals renewed perceptions of self and world.  It takes individuals on a journey which causes them to confront their prejudices and beliefs and to potentially alter their engagement with the world as a result.  The Disappearing similarly invites individuals to reconsider their perceptions of the world they live in.  However, where discoveries in Go Back are largely emotional and social, discoveries prompted by The Disappearing relate first and foremost to man’s relationship with the natural world.

‘The African Doctor’

25 Mar

I recently watched The African Doctor.  This film explores the experiences of a recently arrived family of Congolese descent as they seek to find their place in a rural village in France.

Although overly simplistic at times, the text engages with ideas of tolerance, acceptance, identity and communal action.  For these reasons, I think the text has the potential to engage students.

That said, I think I would be reluctant to study this text in isolation.  I think it would work best either as part of a comparative unit, or as a related text for AOS Journey or Discovery.

Familiar environments

30 Jan

Alice Eather’s poem ‘My Story Is Your Story‘ is a powerful poem about the different ways in which Indigenous and non-Indigenous people view Aboriginal land.  Through a series of haunting contrasts Eather is able to communicate the tension between connection to land and destruction for profit.

This would be an interesting text to study as part of a unit about Australian identity as it highlights the fundamental disconnect between viewpoints and, in turn, flags the callous disregard corporations can have for established and entrenched cultural connections.

It would also be an interesting text to study in AOS Discovery for HSC.  Considered alongside The Tempest, for example, it could be used to highlight how perspectives shape discovery.  Considered alongside Go Back to Where You Came From, it could be used to enrich a discussion regarding discovery, Australian identity, racism and responsibility.

The text could also be used as part of a junior AOS with a focus on change, belonging or journeys.  Here, focus would need to be on the role of context in shaping representation and value.

Eather’s poem could also be studied alongside, or as part of a suite of poetry which includes, Selina Nwulu’s ‘Home is a Hostile Lover‘. Together, the poems offer interesting representations of connection to place and the role of corporations in threatening the physicality and sacredness of place.

 

‘Healthy Start’

25 Jan

I think I am on a short story kick!  I have read Etgar Keret’s ‘Healthy Start‘ and cannot help but think it would make a great related text for AOS Discovery.

The text centres upon a change meeting and mistaken identity.  Sitting in a cafe, our protagonist is approached by a man who presumes he is someone else.  Our protagonist does not correct him.

I like this narrative as it explores how chance encounters can lead to discoveries about self and the world.

 

‘A Ride Out Of Phrao’

23 Jan

Dina Nayeri’s ‘A Ride Out Of Phrao‘ is an interesting narrative about a woman who joins the Peace Corps and moves to Thailand in order to escape the embarrassment of her life in America.

If using this as a related text for AOS Discovery, students should explore the interlinked nature of discoveries about self, others and the world as Shirin, the protagonist, establishes herself in Thailand.  Students should also consider the possibility that the move to Thailand and the establishment of a life there offers Shirin an opportunity to rediscover herself as well as the values and relationships she holds dear.

This short story could make an interesting partner to Go Back to Where You Came From as it engages with discoveries made while journeying and exploring unfamiliar cultural contexts.  It could also pair well with some of Frost’s or Gray’s poetry, particularly in terms of discovering through reflection and experience as well as engagement with place.

For other related material ideas please click here.

 

‘Nutshell’

21 Jan

I recently read Nutshell by Ian McEwan.  In this creative re-imagining of Hamlet, the unborn child serves as witness, in the womb, to the schemes of his mother and uncle.

While I found the concept a bit creepy, and the execution overly dramatic, flowery and, at times, uncomfortable, I do think this novel has potential as a related text for AOS Discovery.  In particular, I think it would be an interesting companion to The Tempest.  In The Tempest, Prospero embarks upon the process of rediscovering and re-evaluating himself and his relationships.  As a result of this process, Prospero is, in effect, ‘born again’ with revised attitudes and perspectives.  In Nutshell, the processes of discovery and rediscovery is explored from the vantage of an unborn child and pertain to relationships, emotions and personalities.  While Prospero’s judgement is sometimes clouded by a desire for vengeance, the child’s in Nutshell is complicated by the innate bond between mother and child.

I think a stronger student could engage meaningfully with the disparate mental landscapes offered in each text, and how discoveries reverberate and impact the self, others, and assessments of the world.

 

‘Mirror’

19 Dec

In The Tempest, discoveries occur when individuals step away from their prejudices and preoccupations.  In other words, the discoveries occur when individuals see the world from perspectives other than their own.

These ideas are echoed in Jeannie Baker’s Mirror, a picture book which compares and contrasts the lives of families in the Western world and the Arab world.  Through reading the text, responders are encouraged to set aside their prejudices and discover commonalities and celebrate difference, rather than demonising a group due to their difference.  In this sense, a parallel can be found between Prospero’s journey of self-discovery in The Tempest and that of the responders in relation to Mirror.

Note too that this text could be used to illuminate ideas in Go Back to Where You Came From.

‘Hotel Rwanda’

17 Dec

Hotel Rwanda would make an interesting choice of related text for Year 12 students.

The film explores the Rwandan genocide and offers an interesting juxtaposition of the horrors committed by some and the humanity exhibited by others.  In doing so, in facilitates discoveries about people, places, society and the world more generally.

It could be a particularly interesting text alongside Guevara’s The Motorcycle Diaries as both are inherently political in nature.  In might also shine alongside some of Frost’s poetry which prompts reflection on, and discoveries about, people and their relationships with the world.

‘Invictus’

12 Dec

Invictus, a film about Nelson Mandela and the South African rugby team, has potential as AOS Discovery related material.

The film is set after apartheid when the ANC is in power.  It is a time of division and a time of uncertainty.  Mandela, the new President, needs to unite the nation.  He seizes upon the Springboks (the South African rugby team) and the upcoming world cup as a means for all South Africans, regardless of race, to come together for a common goal.

In this film, characters discover the limitations and dangers of prejudice.  They also learn about the freedom, support and confidence that comes from having barriers and misunderstanding removed.  Additionally, South Africans begin to discover a new way of living.

It would be an interesting text to pair with Shakespeare’s The Tempest, Guevara’s The Motorcycle Diaries and even, potentially, some of Frost or Gray’s poems.

‘Upgrade U’

26 Sep

Given the success of ‘90 second thesis‘ I decided to create another musical inspired game.  This game is inspired by Beyonce’s song ‘Upgrade U’, and works as follows:

  1. Students dance around the room to Beyonce’s ‘Upgrade U’.
  2. When the music stops students work in pairs to compose a thesis statement that responds to a provided question.
  3. When the teacher yells ‘Upgrade U’ students need to swap thesis statements and upgrade (improve) them.
  4. Improved thesis statements are then discussed as a class.