‘Brown Brother’

2 Feb

Brown Brother‘ is an inspiring spoken word poem delivered by high school student Joshua Iosefo.  It is a profound and emotional examination (and later rejection) of stereotypes; a reminder that honouring one’s heritage and conforming to limiting stereotypes are not the same things.

This would be a great text to study as related material in Distinctive Voices, an elective that is part of the HSC Standard English Course.  Students could engage with the ways in which gestures, tone, occasion and audience enhance the distinctiveness of the voice.

It would also be interesting to include as part of a study about identity, or perhaps as a suite of poetry engaging with the construction and representation of self.  Students could even be challenged to write their own shorter-form spoken word poem about themselves, applicable stereotypes and responses to these.

‘Ha’penny’

1 Feb

I recently read Alan Paton’s short story ‘Ha’penny‘.  Although told simply, it is a profoundly moving narrative about a young boy’s desire for acceptance, belonging and a family of his own.

This would be an interesting text to study as part of a unit about identity; students could focus on how individuals construct themselves in relation to others.

It would also be interesting to study in relation to belonging.  There, the focus would be on the yearning for acceptance, the lengths gone to create connections and the circumstances in which belonging is achieved.

In addition, the text offers an interesting perspective on journeys, offering opportunities for students to explore the journeys of Ha’penny, the narrator and Mrs Maarman.

Familiar environments

30 Jan

Alice Eather’s poem ‘My Story Is Your Story‘ is a powerful poem about the different ways in which Indigenous and non-Indigenous people view Aboriginal land.  Through a series of haunting contrasts Eather is able to communicate the tension between connection to land and destruction for profit.

This would be an interesting text to study as part of a unit about Australian identity as it highlights the fundamental disconnect between viewpoints and, in turn, flags the callous disregard corporations can have for established and entrenched cultural connections.

It would also be an interesting text to study in AOS Discovery for HSC.  Considered alongside The Tempest, for example, it could be used to highlight how perspectives shape discovery.  Considered alongside Go Back to Where You Came From, it could be used to enrich a discussion regarding discovery, Australian identity, racism and responsibility.

The text could also be used as part of a junior AOS with a focus on change, belonging or journeys.  Here, focus would need to be on the role of context in shaping representation and value.

Eather’s poem could also be studied alongside, or as part of a suite of poetry which includes, Selina Nwulu’s ‘Home is a Hostile Lover‘. Together, the poems offer interesting representations of connection to place and the role of corporations in threatening the physicality and sacredness of place.

 

Speaking skills

27 Jan

A recent discussion regarding how to prepare for a public speaking competition got me thinking about the importance of being able to verbally communicate ideas with clarity.

With this in mind, I am toying with providing some of my junior classes with a speaking topic when they enter the class room.  They will have the first three minutes of the lesson to silently brainstorm ideas and map out a one minute speech.  I will then pick two students at random to present.

I think this activity will be valuable as a settling activity.  I also think it will be useful to help students build clarity and confidence in preparation for later speaking tasks and life in general.

 

More Updates!

26 Jan

I am continuing updating some of the lists that I have posted previously.

I am pleased to report that I have now updated the Distinctive Voices related text list.  There are now over 30 examples of Distinctive Voices related texts.

I have also updated my Pairs of Texts post.  It now contains over 90 suggested text pairings for a range of different high school grades and contexts.

I would love to hear in the comments sections if any of these texts have worked for you or your students.  I would also love to hear if you have any additional suggestions for me to add to the lists.

‘Healthy Start’

25 Jan

I think I am on a short story kick!  I have read Etgar Keret’s ‘Healthy Start‘ and cannot help but think it would make a great related text for AOS Discovery.

The text centres upon a change meeting and mistaken identity.  Sitting in a cafe, our protagonist is approached by a man who presumes he is someone else.  Our protagonist does not correct him.

I like this narrative as it explores how chance encounters can lead to discoveries about self and the world.

 

Distinctively Visual Related Texts

24 Jan

Below is a list of possible related material for the Standard English Module A elective ‘Distinctively Visual’.

  1. A Monster Calls by Patrick Ness (novel)
  2. And of Clay We Are Created‘ by Isabel Allende (short story)
  3. Approved For Adoption directed by Laurent Boileau & Jung Henin (film)
  4. A Streetcar Named Desire by Tennessee Williams (play)
  5. Because who is perfect?‘ (advertisement)
  6. Ernest and Celestine directed by Benjamin Renner (film)
  7. Grave of the Fireflies (film)
  8. ‘Home’ by Warsan Shire (poem)
  9. Lion directed by Garth Davis (film)
  10. Martin’s Big Words by Doreen Rappaport (picture book)
  11. Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck (novel)
  12. Persepolis by Marjane Satrapi (film or graphic novel)
  13. Scattered Lives by Sally McKenzie (play)
  14. Terrible Things by Eve Bunting (picture book)
  15. The Arrival by Shaun Tan (picture book)
  16. The Boat by Nam Le (adapted as an SBS interactive) (interactive graphic novel)
  17. The Heart and the Bottle by Oliver Jeffers (picture book)
  18. The Pearl by John Steinbeck (novel)
  19. The Rabbits by Shaun Tan (picture book)
  20. The Secret Life of Walter Mitty directed by Ben Stiller (film)
  21. To This Day by Shane Koyczan (graphic novel or spoken word poem).

‘A Ride Out Of Phrao’

23 Jan

Dina Nayeri’s ‘A Ride Out Of Phrao‘ is an interesting narrative about a woman who joins the Peace Corps and moves to Thailand in order to escape the embarrassment of her life in America.

If using this as a related text for AOS Discovery, students should explore the interlinked nature of discoveries about self, others and the world as Shirin, the protagonist, establishes herself in Thailand.  Students should also consider the possibility that the move to Thailand and the establishment of a life there offers Shirin an opportunity to rediscover herself as well as the values and relationships she holds dear.

This short story could make an interesting partner to Go Back to Where You Came From as it engages with discoveries made while journeying and exploring unfamiliar cultural contexts.  It could also pair well with some of Frost’s or Gray’s poetry, particularly in terms of discovering through reflection and experience as well as engagement with place.

For other related material ideas please click here.

 

Making updates

22 Jan

I am taking time during the school holidays to update some of related text lists.  Thus far, I have tackled Exploring Transitions and Discovery.

There are now over 30 related text suggestions for Exploring Transitions and approximately 60 related text suggestions for Discovery.

I would love to hear in the comments sections if any of these texts have worked for you or your students.  I would also love to hear if you have any additional suggestions for me to add to the lists.

‘Nutshell’

21 Jan

I recently read Nutshell by Ian McEwan.  In this creative re-imagining of Hamlet, the unborn child serves as witness, in the womb, to the schemes of his mother and uncle.

While I found the concept a bit creepy, and the execution overly dramatic, flowery and, at times, uncomfortable, I do think this novel has potential as a related text for AOS Discovery.  In particular, I think it would be an interesting companion to The Tempest.  In The Tempest, Prospero embarks upon the process of rediscovering and re-evaluating himself and his relationships.  As a result of this process, Prospero is, in effect, ‘born again’ with revised attitudes and perspectives.  In Nutshell, the processes of discovery and rediscovery is explored from the vantage of an unborn child and pertain to relationships, emotions and personalities.  While Prospero’s judgement is sometimes clouded by a desire for vengeance, the child’s in Nutshell is complicated by the innate bond between mother and child.

I think a stronger student could engage meaningfully with the disparate mental landscapes offered in each text, and how discoveries reverberate and impact the self, others, and assessments of the world.