Tag Archives: Change

‘Viceroy’s House’

11 Jun

I recently watched Viceroy’s House, a film about the transition of British India to independence.  The film was beautifully made, utilising the difficulties of a love between a Hindu (Jeet Kumar) and Muslim (Aalia Noor) to represent the divisions in a nation that will need to be partitioned in order to realise dreams of independence.

I think the film could be an interesting partner for a study of Shakespeare’s Romeo & Juliet.  This pairing would be a particularly useful way of exploring how the relationship between protagonists illuminates broader social tensions.

It would also be a good related text for Year 11 AOS Journeys or Change.  In both instances, students would be able to analyse the experiences of characters and then connect this to journeys or change on a national scale.

‘Boys Without Names’

4 Mar

I recently read Kashmira Sheth’s Boys Without Names and loved it! I think it appealed as it is a narrative about resilience, strength, friendship and family.  In this text, Gopal is separated from his family and has to survive in challenging circumstances.  He also needs to be build relationships with a group of boys in the same predicament as himself.

I think this text would be particularly well suited to a Year 7 or 8 class.

Familiar environments

30 Jan

Alice Eather’s poem ‘My Story Is Your Story‘ is a powerful poem about the different ways in which Indigenous and non-Indigenous people view Aboriginal land.  Through a series of haunting contrasts Eather is able to communicate the tension between connection to land and destruction for profit.

This would be an interesting text to study as part of a unit about Australian identity as it highlights the fundamental disconnect between viewpoints and, in turn, flags the callous disregard corporations can have for established and entrenched cultural connections.

It would also be an interesting text to study in AOS Discovery for HSC.  Considered alongside The Tempest, for example, it could be used to highlight how perspectives shape discovery.  Considered alongside Go Back to Where You Came From, it could be used to enrich a discussion regarding discovery, Australian identity, racism and responsibility.

The text could also be used as part of a junior AOS with a focus on change, belonging or journeys.  Here, focus would need to be on the role of context in shaping representation and value.

Eather’s poem could also be studied alongside, or as part of a suite of poetry which includes, Selina Nwulu’s ‘Home is a Hostile Lover‘. Together, the poems offer interesting representations of connection to place and the role of corporations in threatening the physicality and sacredness of place.

 

Comparing sample responses

18 Aug

I am a huge fan of deconstructing sample responses with my students in class.  I think it is really helpful for them to be able to understand and apply the criteria to a piece of writing.  Sometimes I provide my students with A-range responses and, in doing so, give them something to aim towards.  However, on other occasions I provide them with weaker responses and we work together to improve them.

Typically the samples I provide are paragraph extracts. I have observed, however, that students struggle with creating introductions that meaningfully engage with the question.  As such, I think this time I will provide my students with a selection of introductions, all responding to the same question.  One of these introductions will be A-range, and the others B, C and D-range.  Students will be required to annotate the introductions according to a provided set of a criteria and, based on their annotations, order the introductions from A to D range.

 

Pairs of texts

31 Mar

I have spent a lot of time recently thinking about interesting textual pairings for study as part of a comparative unit.  Many of my ideas are not suitable for my school context or the ability levels of my classes.  However, I do think that, in the right contexts and with the right classes, all could form the basis of interesting and engaging units.

  1. A Lesson Before Dying (novel) & To Kill a Mockingbird (film)
  2. A Long Way Gone (memoir) & Freedom Writers (film)
  3. A Long Way Gone (memoir) & Hotel Rwanda (film)
  4. A Long Way Gone (memoir) & Schindler’s List (film)
  5. Americanah (novel) & selected episodes of Black-ish (television series)
  6. A Monster Calls (novel) & Boy (film)
  7. A Monster Calls (novel) & Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close (film)
  8. Anzac Girls (television series) & Poetry of Siegfried Sassoon (poetry)
  9. Bad Feminist (collection of essays) & For Colored Girls (film)
  10. Brave New World (novel) & The Crucible (play)
  11. Brave New World (novel) & Never Let Me Go (film)
  12. Brave New World (novel) & V for Vendetta (film)
  13. Briar Rose (novel) & Grave of the Fireflies (film)
  14. Briar Rose (novel) & Lion (film)
  15. Briar Rose (novel) & Night (autobiography)
  16. Briar Rose (novel) & Schindler’s List (film)
  17. Deadline (novel) & Dead Poets Society (film)
  18. Deadline (novel) & The Fault In Our Stars (film)
  19. Deadline (novel) & The Secret Life of Walter Mitty (film)
  20. Deadly, Unna? (novel) & A United Kingdom (film)
  21. Deadly, Unna? (novel) & Hairspray (film)
  22. Deadly, Unna? (novel) & Invictus (film)
  23. Deadly, Unna? (novel) & Remember the Titans (films)
  24. Deadly, Unna? (novel) & Selected episodes of Redfern Now (television series)
  25. El Deafo (graphic novel) & The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time (novel)
  26. Etiquette and Espionage (novel) & Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone (film)
  27. Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close (novel) & After the Storm (film)
  28. Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close (novel) & 11’09’01 (collection of short films)
  29. Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close (novel) & Lion (film)
  30. Face (novel) & The Intouchables (film)
  31. Fahrenheit 451 (novel) & Persepolis (graphic novel or film)
  32. Fahrenheit 451 (novel) & V For Vendetta (film)
  33. For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Suicide / When the Rainbow is Enuf (choreopoem) & Mustang (film)
  34. Frankenstein (novel) & Frankenweenie (film)
  35. Frankenstein (novel) & Never Let Me Go (film)
  36. Frankenstein (novel) & The Rocky Horror Picture Show (film)
  37. Girl Rising (film) & Poetry of Maya Angelou (poetry)
  38. Hamlet (play) & Nutshell (novel)
  39. Hiroshima (novel) & Grave of the Fireflies (film)
  40. Life of Pi (novel) & Castaway (film)
  41. Lord of the Flies (novel) & Where the Wild Things Are (film)
  42. Lord of the Flies (novel) & The Hunger Games (film)
  43. Macbeth (play) & Selected episodes of Designated Survivor (television series)
  44. Macbeth (play) & The Dressmaker (film)
  45. Macbeth (play) & The Gods of Wheat Street (television series)
  46. Maus (graphic novel) & A Long Way Gone (memoir)
  47. Maus (graphic novel) & Night (autobiography)
  48. Maus (graphic novel) & Schindler’s List (film)
  49. March (novel) & Little Wome(novel)
  50. Me and Earl and the Dying Girl (novel) & The Fault in Our Stars (film)
  51. Night (autobiography) & A Long Way Gone (memoir)
  52. Night (autobiography) & Over A Thousand Hills I Walk With You (biography)
  53. Night (autobiography) & Rabbit-Proof Fence (film)
  54. Night (autobiography) & Schindler’s List (film)
  55. Night (autobiography) & The Seven Stages of Grieving (play)
  56. Nona and Me (novel) & Looking for Alibrandi (film)
  57. Nona and Me (novel) & September (film)
  58. Of Mice and Men (novel) & Hunt for the Wilderpeople (film)
  59. Othello (play) & V For Vendetta (film)
  60. Othello (play) & Gone Girl (film)
  61. Over A Thousand Hills I Walk With You (biography) & Hotel Rwanda (film)
  62. Over A Thousand Hills I Walk With You (biography) & Lion (film)
  63. Over A Thousand Hills I Walk With You (biography) & Maus (graphic novel)
  64. Over A Thousand Hills I Walk With You (biography) & Night (autobiography)
  65. Over A Thousand Hills I Walk With You (biography) & Schindler’s List (film)
  66. Pride & Prejudice (novel) & Bride and Prejudice (film)
  67. Pride & Prejudice (novel) & Bridget Jones’s Diary (film)
  68. Pride & Prejudice (novel) & Mustang (film)
  69. Refugee Boy (novel) & Freedom Writers (film)
  70. Refugee Boy (novel) & The African Doctor (film)
  71. Refugee Boy (novel) & The Arrival (picture book)
  72. Romeo & Juliet (play) & Alex and Eve (film)
  73. Romeo & Juliet (play) & A United Kingdom (film)
  74. Romeo & Juliet (play) & Freedom Writers (film)
  75. Romeo & Juliet (play) & Hairspray (film)
  76. Romeo & Juliet (play) & Meet the Patels (film)
  77. Romeo & Juliet (play) & Mustang (film)
  78. Romeo & Juliet (play) & My Big Fat Greek Wedding (film)
  79. Romeo & Juliet (play) & Tanna (film)
  80. Romeo & Juliet (play) & The Fault in Our Stars (film or novel)
  81. Romeo & Juliet (play) & Titanic (film)
  82. Romeo & Juliet (play) & Viceroy’s House (film)
  83. Romeo & Juliet (play) & West Side Story (film)
  84. Scattered Lives (play) & Americannah (novel)
  85. Scattered Lives (play) & Freedom Writers (film)
  86. Scattered Lives (play) & Looking for Alibrandi (novel)
  87. Scattered Lives (play) & Poetry of Peter Skrzynecki (poetry)
  88. Scattered Lives (play) & Poetry of Selina Nwulu (poetry)
  89. Scattered Lives (play) & Poetry of Warsan Shire (poetry)
  90. Schindler’s Ark (novel) & Hotel Rwanda (film)
  91. Speak (novel) & For Colored Girls (film)
  92. Stargirl (novel) & Wadjda (film)
  93. The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian (novel) & Hunt for the Wilderpeople (film)
  94. The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind (memoir) & Queen of Katwe (film)
  95. The Color Purple (novel) & For Colored Girls (film)
  96. The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time (novel) & Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close (film)
  97. The Dreamer (novel) & Billy Elliot (film)
  98. The First Third (novel) & Boy (film)
  99. The Fault in Our Stars (novel) & Me and Earl and the Dying Girl (film)
  100. The Help (novel) & A United Kingdom (film)
  101. The Help (novel) & Remember the Titans (film)
  102. The Help (novel) & The Blindside (film)
  103. The Outsiders (novel) & Hunt for the Wilderpeople (film)
  104. The Outsiders (novel) & Freedom Writers (film)
  105. The Outsiders (novel) & Yolngu Boy (film)
  106. The Rabbits (picture book) & Deadly, Unna? (novel)
  107. The Rabbits (picture book) & Poetry of Oodgeroo Noonuccal (poetry)
  108. The Rabbits (picture book) & Rabbit-Proof Fence (film)
  109. The Scarlet Letter (novel) & Easy A (film)
  110. The Skull Beneath the Skin (novel) & The Real Inspector Hound (play)
  111. The Street Sweeper by Elliot Perlman (novel) & Freedom Writers (film)
  112. The Story of Edgar Sawtelle (novel) & Hamlet (play or film)
  113. The Kite Runner (novel) & Big Fish (film)
  114. The Kite Runner (novel) & Boy (film)
  115. To Kill a Mockingbird (novel) & A United Kingdom (film)
  116. To Kill a Mockingbird (novel) & Hairspray (film)
  117. To Kill a Mockingbird (novel) & Poetry of Langston Hughes (poetry)
  118. To Kill a Mockingbird (novel) & Remember the Titans (film)
  119. To Kill a Mockingbird (novel) & Selected episodes of Redfern Now (television series)
  120. To Kill a Mockingbird (novel) & The Blindside (film)
  121. To Kill a Mockingbird (novel) & The Help (film)
  122. To This Day (graphic novel) & Wonder (novel)
  123. To This Day (graphic novel) & Face (novel)
  124. Vernon God Little (novel) & Elephant (film)
  125. Voices from Chernobyl (non-fiction) & Grave of the Fireflies (film)
  126. War Horse (film) & Poetry of Wilfred Owen (poetry).

Creative writing prompt

1 Oct

I came across a beautiful short film entitled ‘A Kiss Deferred‘.  This film tells the story of young, interrupted love.   I would like to use this film in a Year 11 or Year 12 class as inspiration for creative writing.  Weaker students would have the option of simply engaging with the story as it is presented.  Stronger students could experiment with perspective or hypothesise about the future in order to explore changes in the relationship, discoveries about self and others, or the complexities of belonging.  The stronger students could also borrow a line or image from the film, using that to inspire a completely different story.

Getting into character

20 Sep

When crafting short stories, students often find it difficult to get into the mindset of their protagonist.  I happened upon an article which offers insight into the minds and experiences of a range of people who, by virtue of their professions, spend time in other people’s homes.  Students could use the provided profiles as stimulus for narratives which explore the complexities of belonging, the physical things discovered in spaces, emotional discoveries about self, relationships and the world, and the changes to relationships over time.

‘Set No Path’

10 Jun

Set No Path‘ is a short film about a group of friends who are spending one final night together before they disperse, go to college and embark on new adventures.

The film functions as a great related text for  AOS Belonging (which many schools have adopted as the Year 11 AOS) as it foregrounds the complexities of personal relationships.  Flashbacks and diptych-style shots highlight the dynamics of friendship and the numerous ways belonging is demonstrated.  The film also explores the consequences when one group member is unable to cope with changes in relationships and circumstances.

Speaking of changes, this film also works as a related text for AOS Change (another popular Year 11 option).  Of particular interest if using the film for this purpose is the tension and conflict that result when not all members of a group have the same views about an impending change.

Students studying the Year 12 course are also able to utilise this text.  As a related text in AOS Discovery, this text can be used to highlight the impact of discoveries on individuals and the way that relationships shape responses to discoveries.

As flagged by the inclusion of this film in my ‘Exploring Transitions’ related text list, this film also has particular relevance to Module C of the Standard English course.  The film begins on the eve of group members’ transitions into new worlds and canvasses the emotions associated with this impending change in environment and circumstances.  It also presents the perspective of someone who resists changes, not just for himself but for the whole group.  Ultimately, this person’s actions impede the intended and anticipated transformations of others in the group, instead condemning them to repeating their parents’ lives rather than living their own.

Related text: ‘A search for one boy’

30 Mar

I am finding National Geographic to be a bit of a rabbit hole; I visit the site to find one thing and, 14 clicks later, 2 hours of my life have vanished.  I am not suggesting that this is a waste of time, it is not, however I think I do need to be conscious of my fascination with the articles and perhaps not visit the site while on a break from a task that has a strict deadline!

As part of my meandering, I found an interesting article entitled ‘Why my photo from Guinea sparked a soccer star’s search for one boy‘.  Like most articles in National Geographic, this one includes both words and pictures.  Much like the article I found yesterday, it is also suitable as a related text for Area of Studies in Years 11 and 12.

AOS Belonging (Year 11)

This text explores belonging to place, community, and family.  It explore represents these ideas through language and visuals.

As an interesting addition to the typical representation of belonging, the article discusses the way in which an image sparked a connection with a reader and how that reader is now trying to build a formal and helpful relationship of belonging with the community.

AOS Change (Year 11)

The article explores the changes (physical and emotional) that the community has undergone.  It also highlights the possibility of change in the future through partnership with individuals and organisations who wish to provide goods and support to the community.

The notion that an outside influence can change the trajectory of one’s life or the nature of one’s experience flags a possible point of connection with Looking for Alibrandi; in that text, three generations of women had their lives changed through the intervention of people outside their immediate communities.

AOS Discovery (Year 12)

The text enables readers to discover place and relationships.  The idea that discovery is linked to observation flags a possible point of connection to a number of Robert Gray’s poems (for example, ‘Late Ferry’).  Furthermore, the notion that discovery might facilitate change in the future links this text to Gray’s ‘Flames and Dangling Wire’; in both it is clear that some kind of intervention is necessary if trajectories are to be reversed.

RELATED TEXT: ‘Yearbook’

25 Mar

I recently viewed an enlightening short film entitled ‘Yearbook‘.  The film details the experiences of a man who is trusted to chronicle human experience for all time.  The focus is on the names and faces that the protagonist elects to remember, and those which he is required to exclude from the record.

This film raises some interesting ideas about discovery.  In particular, it causes us to critically evaluate how discoveries are framed and represented, and to ask whether the discoveries we make are, in fact, complete or authentic.

It is also offers some interesting ideas about belonging.  Notably, I found myself asking: Who decided who belongs?  What criteria establishes belonging?  Why does one person belong but another doesn’t?

There are references in the film to change too, not least of all the idea that the significance (or relative significance) of a person changes in response to circumstances.