Tag Archives: Go Back to Where You Came From

‘The Disappearing’

14 Jul

The Disappearing is an interactive website which offers a means of poetically representing places and experiences which are disappearing.  These places and experiences are sometimes disappearing due to the passage of time,  other times due to environmental factors, and sometimes due to urbanisation.

I think this would be an interesting related text to use alongside Go Back to Where You Came From for HSC AOS Discovery.   Go Back explores individuals renewed perceptions of self and world.  It takes individuals on a journey which causes them to confront their prejudices and beliefs and to potentially alter their engagement with the world as a result.  The Disappearing similarly invites individuals to reconsider their perceptions of the world they live in.  However, where discoveries in Go Back are largely emotional and social, discoveries prompted by The Disappearing relate first and foremost to man’s relationship with the natural world.

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Familiar environments

30 Jan

Alice Eather’s poem ‘My Story Is Your Story‘ is a powerful poem about the different ways in which Indigenous and non-Indigenous people view Aboriginal land.  Through a series of haunting contrasts Eather is able to communicate the tension between connection to land and destruction for profit.

This would be an interesting text to study as part of a unit about Australian identity as it highlights the fundamental disconnect between viewpoints and, in turn, flags the callous disregard corporations can have for established and entrenched cultural connections.

It would also be an interesting text to study in AOS Discovery for HSC.  Considered alongside The Tempest, for example, it could be used to highlight how perspectives shape discovery.  Considered alongside Go Back to Where You Came From, it could be used to enrich a discussion regarding discovery, Australian identity, racism and responsibility.

The text could also be used as part of a junior AOS with a focus on change, belonging or journeys.  Here, focus would need to be on the role of context in shaping representation and value.

Eather’s poem could also be studied alongside, or as part of a suite of poetry which includes, Selina Nwulu’s ‘Home is a Hostile Lover‘. Together, the poems offer interesting representations of connection to place and the role of corporations in threatening the physicality and sacredness of place.

 

‘A Ride Out Of Phrao’

23 Jan

Dina Nayeri’s ‘A Ride Out Of Phrao‘ is an interesting narrative about a woman who joins the Peace Corps and moves to Thailand in order to escape the embarrassment of her life in America.

If using this as a related text for AOS Discovery, students should explore the interlinked nature of discoveries about self, others and the world as Shirin, the protagonist, establishes herself in Thailand.  Students should also consider the possibility that the move to Thailand and the establishment of a life there offers Shirin an opportunity to rediscover herself as well as the values and relationships she holds dear.

This short story could make an interesting partner to Go Back to Where You Came From as it engages with discoveries made while journeying and exploring unfamiliar cultural contexts.  It could also pair well with some of Frost’s or Gray’s poetry, particularly in terms of discovering through reflection and experience as well as engagement with place.

For other related material ideas please click here.

 

‘Mirror’

19 Dec

In The Tempest, discoveries occur when individuals step away from their prejudices and preoccupations.  In other words, the discoveries occur when individuals see the world from perspectives other than their own.

These ideas are echoed in Jeannie Baker’s Mirror, a picture book which compares and contrasts the lives of families in the Western world and the Arab world.  Through reading the text, responders are encouraged to set aside their prejudices and discover commonalities and celebrate difference, rather than demonising a group due to their difference.  In this sense, a parallel can be found between Prospero’s journey of self-discovery in The Tempest and that of the responders in relation to Mirror.

Note too that this text could be used to illuminate ideas in Go Back to Where You Came From.

‘Go Back’

11 Sep

This coming year, my Standard students will be studying the first season of Go Back to Where You Came From as their set text for AOS Discovery.  This text represents itself as a social experiment in which participants are guided, through carefully orchestrated activities and experiences, to better understand and empathise with the experience of refugees.

When engaging with this text, students need to be particularly aware of the ways in which the journeys of participants are shaped by the inherent desire of the director and producer to cause participants to confront their fears and transform as a result.  Indeed, the hope is clearly that, by the end of the series, both participants and the general public will treat refugees with greater humanity and dignity.

This desire to evoke empathy is also evident in  ‘A New Horizon‘ by Ruth Pollard   I think it would be interesting to show this text to my students, asking them to identify and explain how the composers seek to address the same purpose in fundamentally different ways.   Asking students to move back and forth between the texts will have the added benefit of developing their synthesis skills.